© 2004 by Thomas F. Yezerski

 

Mimmy & Sophie: All Around the Town

  • written by Miriam Cohen
  • illustrated by Thomas F. Yezerski
  • Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2004
  • 69 pp., black and white illustrations
  • ages 7-10
  • ISBN-10: 0-374-34989-4
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-374-34989-9

Summary

Mimmy and Sophie aren’t ready to go home yet! The sisters return for six more adventures in this chapter-book sequel to the highly-reviewed picture book, Mimmy and Sophie. Mimmy, 6, and Sophie, 4, have great fun in simple ways while living in Brooklyn during the 1930’s Great Depression. Like all sisters, they often don’t get along, but they’re always there for each other when it counts.

The book opens to find the whole gang on the way to find buried treasure “In The Alley,” and Sophie may know more than the older kids give her credit for. “Coney Island” is a vivid memory of a family trip to the famous amusement pier, where the girls think of a way to make the most of their money. In “Glory, Glory, Hallelujah!,” Sophie tries to keep up with her big sister while playing school on the front steps. Next, the girls are on their own for an afternoon at the Grand Movie Palace in “At The Movies.” It’s spring in “Liverwurst Stockings,” and Mimmy and Sophie go play in the muddy vacant lot so the other kids don’t see they still have to wear their winter stockings. In the last chapter, Mimmy doesn’t believe Sophie’s story that she went to “Babyland” all by herself.

 © 2004 by Thomas F. Yezerski

© 2004 by Thomas F. Yezerski

Reviews and Awards

Like Mimmy and Sophie (1999), this gentle chapter book about two sisters in Brooklyn, New York, during the Depression creates a strong sense of the time and place, and, as with all good writing, the particulars will connect with readers today . . . Yezerski’s period black-and-white illustrations do a great job of creating the neighborhood details (including a glimpse of Momma at the laundry tub) as well as the bond between the sisters. Grandparents and great-grandparents will appreciate the nostalgia, and preschoolers will enjoy the stories of a past that speaks to them. A good story to read to younger children.
— Booklist
Mimmy and Sophie are back! Cohen and Yezerski team up again with six endearing stories about sisters growing up in Depression-era Brooklyn . . . These small moments are the ones of childhood everywhere and should bring a knowing nod to children and parents alike . . . These comforting, familiar situations, nostalgically illustrated, will bring a smile to any young reader. A treasure for those not quite ready for Cleary and Hurwitz.
— Kirkus Reviews
This gentle chapter book takes readers back to Brooklyn during the Depression era . . . Although there’s a clear historical setting, many of these adventures could take place today. With plenty of dialogue and straightforward action, this charming story is just right for newly independent readers. Yezerski’s black-and-white drawings illustrate the era, while conveying all of the energy of the characters.
— School Library Journal
Best Books of the Year
— School Library Journal
New York City Book Award
— The New York Society Library

Details

© 2004 by Thomas F. Yezerski

When editor Frances Foster told me we were going to do this second book as a chapter book instead of a picture book, I wasn’t sure about it. What would Mimmy and Sophie be like without the moody antique coloring and the action of the comic book frames? It turned out that the black and white format is perfect for the nostalgic scenes, and the smaller size of this book emphasizes the cuteness. It really is all about Mimmy and Sophie. Illustrating this book was like visiting old friends who haven’t changed a bit. I picked up my pencil for the second Mimmy and Sophie book four years after I put down my paintbrush for the first! The girls were still the funny, imaginative, independent youngsters I loved, but I found I was the one who had grown up. Now I was a better artist and I knew these characters like my own sisters. I’m grateful to Frances, and the author, Miriam Cohen, for letting me spend more time with these fun kids and for giving me a second chance to do a good job.